Assorted Cut Flowers

1Name: Agapanthus
Native to: South Africa Availability – May through August
Longevity – 5 – 7 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – Another name for this plant is the Lily of the Nile and it comes in the popular blue, white and other colors.
Handling and Care – The plant itself thrives in sunlight, However the cut flower should be placed in room temperature without exposing it to direct sunlight. Filling your vase with water to reach half its length is all that you need. Also, cut at least 1/2‟‟ from the stem. Do so every second day and change the water at the same time.
Fun Facts – Agapanthus contains several anti-inflammatory characteristics that help reduce swelling and
inflammation, relieve or suppress coughing and it supports the immune system to cure and fight infections.

2Name: Amaryllis
Native to:
South Africa
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – 7 – 10 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – The Amaryllis has a large scope of varieties such as the South African Amaryllis, the Baby Star Amaryllis and the Alfresco Amaryllis.
Handling and Care – The fresh cut flowers should be placed in lukewarm water for a few hours,
submerging the stems It should be stored and/or kept in 40-50F degree temperature on a daily basis for it to last longer. Cut about 1/2 an inch from the bottom of the stem every other day and change the water, adding cool water.
Fun Facts – Legend states the Amaryllis began with a reserved and timorous nymph. Amaryllis
supposedly fell in love with Alteo but her affections were never reciprocated. Hoping she could win his heart, she bestowed this flower onto him to symbolize radiant beauty and pride for one‟s partner.

3Name: Anemones
Native to: North America, Japan and some European countries
Availability – October through May
Longevity – Up to 7 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – The anemone Banda Greek wildflower, Poppy anemone and Chinese anemone are among the popular varieties.
Handling and Care – Display this flower with no direct sunlight and away from air vents. The level of water should remain constant with warm water added daily. For best results, re-cut the stems 1 inch from the bottom every other days.
Fun Facts – The anemone is referred to a the windflower. The Greek for wind give it its name. In China, however, superstitions ring around this flower since it is known as the flower of death. Similarly, in Egypt, the flower is and was considered a symbol of sickness and potential death.

4Name: Bouvardia
Native to: Tropical America
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – 4 – 7 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – There are two main types: Bouvardiaternifoli and Bouvardiaternifolia, shinning a bright red color.
Handling and Care – This flower is sensitive to cold temperatures and should not be stored below 45 degrees F. As with most cut flowers, the Bouvardia should be cut at a slant, close to the bottom of the stem. Because these are prone to water loss, water daily and add fertilizer (flower food) when needed.
Fun Facts – The Bouvardia is named after Charles Bouvard, the physician to Louis XIII and the
superintendent of the Royal Gardens (Paris). Up until recently, this flower was not popular nor was it seen in the homes of citizens. Now, it makes its way into bouquets as a strong accented flower.

5Name: Delphinium
Native to: North America and Europe
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – Up to 7 days
Dries well – Yes!
Varieties – There are three different varieties of delphiniums including the Belladonna group, the Elatum group and the Pacific hybrids.
Handling and Care – After the delphinium has reached its full bloom, cut the flower stalks as close to the stem as you can. Water as needed, however it is recommended the vase water’s is changed every 3rd day.
Fun Facts – A delphinium is derived from the Greek word “delphis,” meaning dolphin. Other names include Lark‟s Heel, Lark‟s Claw and Knight‟s Spur. Native Americans and European settlers used this flower to make blue dye because it was believed its color would drive away poisonous scorpions. Also, its dolphin shape gives it the honor of being the July birth flower.

6Name: French Tulips
Native to: Persia
Availability – January through April
Longevity – 6 – 10 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – The Tulip Big Smile, Blushing Beauty and Tulip Menteen are popular varieties.
Handling and Care – Keep the ends of the stems (1/2‟‟) trimmed for a longer vase life. Dissolve fresh flower food packet in clean water-filled vase to avoid diseases. Keep your flower in cool location out of direct sunlight. Change water and cut the end of stems every other day.
Fun Facts – Like many other tulip varieties, the French tulip was discovered by the French population,
and ordered back to Europe because of its high demand. Tulip mania was a direct result of this. The
Dutch Golden Age created its craze and value in European countries.

7Name: Freesia
Native to: South Africa Availability – Year Round
Longevity – 5 – 7 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – Freesias come in 10 different varieties, most of which are hybrids. Red and yellow Freesia are the two most popular colors.
Handling and Care – A vase with room temperature water will help elongate the life of your flower by up to 3 or 4 days. Water should be replaced every third day and reach water levels up to the top of the vase. Re-cut ½‟‟ from the stem to the base to avoid bacterial growth. Allow for new buds to open while removing older, withered, blossoms.
Fun Facts – The freesia flower is named after a German physician named F.H.T. Freese. Its symbolism
is popular in the U.K. For instance, the color yellow symbolizes renewed energy while the white refers to purity during the spring and winter months. Their strong smell (mostly of the pink variety) makes them popular for bouquets and Ballerina dancers who claim to see the shape of a ballerina within the flower.

8Name: Gerber Daisy
Native to: South Africa
Availability – Year round
Longevity – 6 to 8 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – Single, double and multi-petal forms of the Gerber Daisy are available.
Handling and Care – Keep the ends of the stems (1/2‟‟) trimmed for a longer vase life. Dissolve fresh flower food packet in clean water-filled vase to avoid diseases. Keep your flower in cool location out of direct sunlight. Change water and cut the end of stems every other day.
Fun Facts – The Gerber Daisy was discovered by Scotsman Robert Jameson near Barberton, South Africa. It became a popular flower after breeding programs began in England in 1890 to enhance the quality and color of the flower. The Netherlanders and Columbians soon caught onto this flower and became the primary distributors of the Gerber daisy. Today, it is the fifth most popular flower.

9Name: Hydrangea
Native to: Japan
Availability – April through autumn
Longevity – 4 7 days
Dries well – Yes, especially the outdoor rusty variety.
Varieties – Macrophyllas Hydrangeas are the big flowered hydrangeas seen in nurseries, usually the blue, pink and purple colors. Arborescens and Paniculata Hydrangeas are not as well known and require alternate pruning techniques.
Handling and Care –  Keep the ends of the stems (1/2‟‟) trimmed for a longer vase life. Dissolve fresh flower food packet in clean water-filled vase to avoid diseases. Keep your flower in cool location out of direct sunlight. Change water and cut the end of stems every other day.
Fun Facts – The name hydrangea comes from the Greek word “hydor” meaning water and “angos” translating to water vessel. Its name implies its need for plenty of water and star-shaped flowers packed closely together lavishly celebrate a couples 4th wedding anniversary.

10Name: Hypericum (St. Johns Wort)
Native to: Tropical areas
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – 7 – 10 days Dries well – Yes!
Varieties – Hypericum is a berry flower/plant that is generally red, named in short as the Klamath or goat weed.
Handling and Care – Replace the water in the flower‟s vase every 3 days, keeping water close to the top of the vase. Cut 1/2‟‟ from the base of the stems, remembering to remove foliage from the portion of the stem that will be under water.
Fun Facts – Medically, the Hypericum is used to treat moderate to severe depression. In ancient times, herbalists used this plant as a balm for wounds, burns and insects bites. Additionally, it became a popular treatment for malaria after continuous outbreaks.

11Name: Ilex
Native to: Europe
Availability – Winter
Longevity – Up to 7 days
Dries well – Yes!
Varieties – The varieties include the illexaltaclarensis and illexaquifolium. Handling and Care Split ends of the woody stem for better water absorption. Change water every other day and keep in a cool place.
Fun Facts – The English Holly was once a haven for medical doctors. Holly berries are an important food
source for birds, as well a snack  for sheep, goats, and a number of deer species. Animals that ingest Holly berries get their nutrition for the day and contribute to its widespread movement across Canada and the United States.

12Name: Kale Flower
Native to: Europe
Availability – Year round
Longevity – A minimum of 8 days
Dries well – Yes!
Varieties – The Kale flower or, Brassica oleracea, is known most famously as Ornamental Cabbage and the Flowering Kale, in both white and purple varieties. Some varieties come from Japan and are known as
peonies.
Handling and Care – Cut the kale flower stems one inch diagonally from the edged bottom when handling a freshly purchased kale flower. Kale needs at least 4 hours to hydrate and may take up to 12 hours to receive all necessary nutrients. When the water becomes cloudy, change the water. This occurs every 24 to 48 hours. Adding a few drops of chlorine to the water will help prevent bacteria and, thus, the foul smell.
Fun Facts – This flower was present in 100 AD when the Greeks, Romans and early Christians added it
to their cooking for its vitamin C additives. It can be difficult to pinpoint one area of origin because kale was a payment method and a widely distributed flower among the barbarians.

13Name: Lisianthus
Native to: Southern United States, Mexico, Caribbean and Northern
South America.
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – Up to 8 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – The most popular variety lisianthus flowers are the Cinderella Series seeds, while the Cinderella Double Ivory and Cinderella Double Lime sell the most seeds per year.
Handling and Care – Cut the stems and place them in water. Add floral preservative into the water. Place the vase away from direct sunlight in cool temperatures. Note that while blooms that show color may fully open, the smaller buds may not. Cut end of stem and change water daily.
Fun Facts – Lisianthus have a wide range of names such a the Texas Bluebell and Prairie Gentian. Lisianthus symbolize nature from Texas to Mexico. When in their double form, they resemble a rose or peony, while in other forms, they have delicate oval leaves that are given as a symbol of appreciation for occasion among men and women.

14Name: Ornithogalum Arabicum (Star of Bethlehem)
Native to: Europe
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – 6 – 10 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – The two most popular varieties are the Early Star of Bethlehem and the Yellow Star of Bethlehem.
Handling and Care – Cut the stems and place them in water. Add floral preservative into the water. Place the vase away from direct sunlight in cool temperatures. Cut end of stem and change water daily.
Fun Facts – The Star of Bethlehem finds its origin from the Greek language meaning „bird milk.‟ The English version of this flower refers to a reference in the Bible, giving a biblical account of Jesus Christ. The name was given as a celestial object in the sky, shining brightly and thus giving name to the town of Bethlehem where Jesus was born.

15Name: Phlox
Native to: North America
Availability – June to September
Longevity – up to 7 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – The phlox flower is a popular night blooming flower. Names like Fuller‟s White and Blue Moon are popular.
Handling and Care – Cut the stems and place them in water. Add floral preservative into the water. Place the vase away from direct sunlight in cool temperatures. Note that while blooms that show color may fully open, the smaller buds may not. Cut end of stem and change water daily.
Fun Facts – In 1732, the German botanist Johann Jacob Dillenius ordered to write a description of Dr. James Sherard‟s famed Eltham garden, which kept a number of different phlox paniculata. Another version, the phlox drummondii – has been growing widely throughout the United States for centuries and has an interesting history of its own. During the early 1830s, Thomas Drummond (curator of the Belfast Botanic Garden) began exploring this flower, and breeding it to eventually transport to Britain.

16Name: Dutch Tulips
Native to: Europe, Asia and the Middle East
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – 3 – 7 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – The Dutch tulip is also known as the Holland tulip. Tulips range in varieties from the Angel‟s Dream tulip to the spring green tulip.
Handling and Care – Keep the water in your tulips vase clean and replace as necessary. When a clouding appears on the vase, it is time to replace the water. Replace with cool water and use a knife or trimming scissors to cut ¼‟‟ from the base of the tulip stem.
Fun Facts – The Dutch tulip was originally grown in Central Asia. Tulips of all varieties, included the Dutch variety, were used as currency. However, its use was too grand and created a  ‘Tulip Crash’. The government had to impose new trading restrictions on this tulip to avoid over use in the trading market.

17Name: Peonies
Native to: Asian, Southern Europe and Western North America
Availability – April through June
Longevity – Seasonal (may last from April till June).
Dries well – Yes!
Varieties – The Bartzella, Blaze and Border Charm make up the over 230 varieties of peonies.
Handling and Care – Cut the stems and place them in water. Add floral preservative into the water. Place the vase away from direct sunlight in cool temperatures. Cut end of stem and change water daily.
Fun Facts – Peonies were originally cultivated in China over 2,000 years ago, living through harsh winters. The Chinese used the roots for food and medicine purposes. In fact, the Chinese do not consider a peony just a peony; rather, they call it the Flower Fairy after being named the national flower of China during the Qing Dynasty in 1903.

18Name: Ranunculus
Native to: Southwest Asia, Southeast Europe and the eastern region of the Mediterranean.
Availability – Fall to early spring
Longevity – Up to 7 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – The ranunculus has many varieties including the Little leaf buttercup, the Meadow buttercup and Anderson‟s buttercup.
Handling and Care – Re-cut stems as close to the bottom of the stem as possible and water regularly.
The stems are inclined to buckle and curve. If this is not the desired effect you want, keep them wired upright. Leave in indirect sunlight if possible.
Fun Facts – In fairy tales, frogs are apt to change into princes and it was an Asian prince in just such a
story who gave his name to this flower, which grows naturally in swampy ground. The prince in this fairytale was good looking and loved. He sang songs, delightful songs, in the presence of nymphs. He was shy and did not profess his love towards the nymphs before he reached death. After his death he was changed into the flower known today as the ranunculus.

19Name: Thistle
Native to: Eastern Europe
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – 8 – 12 days Dries well – Yes!
Varieties – The blue thistle, Canada thistle and creamy thistle are the most popular varieties.
Handling and Care – Cut the flower stalks at least ½‟‟ from the stem and place in lukewarm water. Repeat the same every other day.
Fun Facts – Milk Thistle, in particular, has medicinal uses. It has been used since the time of the Roman
Empire. Most notably, milk thistle has been used to treat liver ailments. It has also been used to treat kidney and spleen problems back in a time when flowers were sought to have spiritual healing powers.

20Name: Trachelium
Native to: The West and Central Mediterranean
Availability – Year Round
Longevity – 7 – 10 days
Dries well – Yes!
Varieties – The two most popular varieties are the Campanula Trachelium and the Lake Trachelium.
Handling and Care – Your flower should be stored in a room with a cool temperature, away from the direct sunlight. Change the water in its vase every third day or when the water becomes cloudy. This flower tends to dry out easily, so water daily. Cut the stems close to its base when needed.
Fun Facts – The Trachelium is the Greek word meaning „rough throat.‟ Its Greek name gave it its
medicinal use to help cure sore throats and throat disorders. The „Blue Throatwort‟ is another name that
is derived from its medicinal uses.

21Name: Viburnum
Native to: South America and Southeast Asia
Availability – Mid to late spring
Longevity – 5 – 7 days
Dries well – Yes!
Varieties – Varieties include the Guelder Rose, Water Elder, European Cranberrybush, Cramp Bark, Viburnum × bodnantense (hybrid) and Snowball Tree.
Handling and Care – The Viburnum needs plenty of water. Water every 2 to 3 days in either a vase or pot. Cut the flower stalks at least ½‟‟ from the stem of the flower for a longer vase life.
Fun Facts – The fruit of some Viburnum species are edible and can be eaten raw or in the form of jam or jellies. Viburnum comes in bark form and is used in herbal medicine for anti-spasmodic and asthma purposes.  As a homeopathic remedy, Viburnum opulus is used to treat obstinate hiccups; vertigo; eye soreness; headaches, neck aches and backaches.

22Name: Wax Flowers
Native to: Western Australia
Availability – May to December
Longevity – 7 – 10 days
Dries well – No!
Varieties – Wax flowers consists of  a small family of plants containing 21 varieties of evergreen shrubs found naively only in Australia. The ‘Album’ (white flowers), the ‘Bundara Excelsior’ (large pink flowers), ‘Purple Pride’ (reddish-purple flowers), and ‘University’ (red tinged stems).
Handling and Care – Cut the stems at least ½‟‟ from the base of the flower. Remember to replace water every 3 days with cool to cold water. A wax flower should be kept in cooler areas with shade.
Fun Facts – Species in the Chamelaucium alliance family have fruits, or nuts, that usually contain only
one seed and are shed annually. They are never discharged but the entire flower dries and breaks off below the receptacle. One reason this flower became popular was because of its cultivation in Australia after the grandfather of Charles Darwin sought out to define its meaning and medicinal uses.